Jack Lemmon

What’s on TCM: December 2014

Bringing Up Baby Cary Grant Katharine Hepburn

Happy December, everyone! With 2014 in its final days, TCM is ending the year on a high note and there’s much to be excited about this month. December starts with a day of Joan Crawford and Cary Grant movies and ends with a night of movies featuring The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, and in between, there’s a lot of musicals and, of course, Christmas movies, so this is truly my kind of month.

December’s Star of the Month is the eternally suave Cary Grant and his movies will be highlighted every Monday night this month.

Friday Night Spotlight will be showcasing movies directed by Charles Watlers. If you’re a big fan of musicals, you’re going to love Fridays this month.

Since it is December, of course there will be plenty of Christmas classics coming up. If this is what you’re looking for, be sure to keep an eye on the schedule for December 4th, 11th, 18th, 23rd, 24th, and 25th.

Now, let’s get on to the schedule…

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It Happened to Jane (1959)

It Happened to Jane Poster

After the death of her husband, Jane Osgood (Doris Day) decides to start raising and selling lobsters to support her two children.  She’s thrilled to get her first big order from the Marshalltown Country Club, but when she ships the live lobsters by the E&P Railroad, they die because of the railroad’s inattentiveness.  Jane is horribly upset and with help from her longtime friend and lawyer George (Jack Lemmon), they sue the railroad for damages.

When railroad owner Harry Foster Malone (Ernie Kovacs) hears about the lawsuit, he agrees to offer Jane $700, the retail cost of the lobsters.  But since the country club has cancelled all future orders with Jane, she wants money to cover her lost business as well and is willing to fight for it.  She wins her court case, but E&P is willing to drag the case out through appeals.  Not wanting to play that game, Jane files a writ of execution against the railroad and gets a train, the Old 97, instead of money.

After Jane’s story is picked up by local reporter Matilda Runyon (Mary Wickes), the story becomes national news and reporters descend on Jane’s hometown.  The publicity for the E&P Railroad gets even worse when Malone insists that Jane start paying him rent for keeping the Old 97 on the track.  One reporter in particular, Larry Hall (Steve Forrest), takes a real interest in Jane and proposes to her, making George extremely jealous.

Meanwhile, Malone continues to wage war against Jane by cutting off train service to her hometown until she moves the Old 97.  Jane doesn’t know what to do, but George comes up with the idea of using the Old 97 to deliver her lobster orders.  George even offers to shovel coal on the train to make it happen.  But Malone continues to do everything in his power to beat Jane in this battle and keeps re-routing Jane’s train so it takes excessively long for them to get anywhere and eventually run out of coal.  Amidst all the stress of the trip, George manages to win Jane’s heart and even Malone ends up making peace with Jane.

I was totally charmed by It Happened to Jane.  How can anyone not be charmed by Doris Day and Jack Lemmon?  Putting Doris Day and Jack Lemmon together is a recipe for happiness in celluloid form.  I absolutely loved them together; it’s really too bad they didn’t star together in any other movies.  Ernie Kovacs is also very memorable in it.  The story is gentle and light without being overly cheesy. It’s the kind of movie that’s great to watch on a quiet Sunday afternoon.  It Happened to Jane was filmed on location in Connecticut, so it’s full with lovely scenery to look at.  However, it does have what has got to be one of the lamest songs Doris Day has ever sung — “Be Prepared.”  All in all, a very enjoyable flick.  Nothing Earth shatteringly good or bad, just a pleasant way to spend about an hour and a half.

Mister Roberts (1955)

Captain Morton (James Cagney) may officially be the captain of the USS Reluctant, but as far as the crew is concerned, Lieutenant Doug Roberts (Henry Fonda) is the man in charge.  Captain Morton is very strict and routinely denies the crew their small rewards over very minor infractions.  Doug, on the other hand, is much kinder and often ignores the Captain’s orders to make the crew’s life more bearable.  However, the USS Reluctant isn’t seeing any of the action of World War II and Doug would much rather be on active duty than be stuck on that boat.  His closest friend Doc (William Powell) tries to reassure him that his being on the ship means the world to the crew, but that doesn’t stop him from requesting a transfer.

In order for Doug to get a transfer, Captain Morton would have to agree to it and Morton knows that he would look bad if Doug were to leave so he refuses to sign his letters.  Captain Morton hasn’t even let the crew have leave in a very long time, so behind the Captain’s back, Doug bribes an official to get the crew granted one night of leave.  When the Captain finds out about it, he threatens to deny the whole crew their leave unless Doug promises to stop undermining him and to stop requesting transfers.  Doug reluctantly agrees, and the crew is mystified to see Doug suddenly playing into the Captain’s hand.

The crew thinks Doug is just gunning to get a promotion and starts giving him the cold shoulder.  But on the night of V-E Day, Doug listens to a speech on the radio that inspires him to stand up to the Captain.  While the Captain confronts Doug in his office, the intercom is accidentally left on and the whole crew finds out the price Doug paid for them to have their leave.  To show their gratitude, the crew decides to get Doug the transfer he wants so badly.  Before he leaves for Okinawa, the crew presents Doug with their own special award and he finally realizes just how much he really meant to everybody.

With Doug off in Okinawa, Frank Pulver (Jack Lemmon) takes over Doug’s old position on the ship. Frank is pretty intimidated by the Captain, so he can’t bring himself to go against the Captain the way Doug used to.  But when the crew gets word that Doug has been killed, Frank finally finds the nerve to stand up to the Captain.

Genre-wise, Mister Roberts is really in a league of its own.  It deals with World War II, but there aren’t any big battle scenes.  It’s got comedy, but it’s not a farce like Dr. Strangelove.  And for all its lighthearted moments, when it was serious, it was very heartfelt and touching.  It’s very hard to combine all of those genres and do all of them well, but Mister Roberts managed to pull it off.

The part of Doug Roberts is such a perfect Henry Fonda role.  He’s that “everyman fighting for what’s right” type of character that Fonda is best remembered for playing.  As good as Fonda is, Jack Lemmon really steals the show at the end of the movie.  His performance in the scene where he reads Doug’s letters aloud to the crew is so genuinely moving.  He’s great in the rest of the movie, too, but boy did he ever hit it out of the park in that scene.

I love everything about Mister Roberts.  I don’t know why on Earth I put off seeing it for such a long time.

What’s on TCM: August 2012

How is it already time for another round of Summer Under the Stars?!  As usual, TCM has done a great job of coming up with a nice blend of stars who are no strangers to the SUTS schedule and stars who have never been featured before.  The more I look at the schedule, the more excited I get to start my Blogging Under the Stars marathon.

Some of the days I’m most looking forward to are: Myrna Loy (August 2), Marilyn Monroe (August 4), Toshiro Mifune (August 9), Ginger Rogers (August 12), James Cagney (August 14), Lillian Gish (August 15), Jack Lemmon (August 22), Gene Kelly (August 23), Kay Francis (August 21), and Warren William (August 30).  I have seen woefully few Akira Kurosawa films, so I am really looking forward to Toshiro Mifune’s day.  As a fan of silents and pre-codes, I was thrilled to see Lillian Gish, Kay Francis, and Warren William got spots on this year’s line-up.  Lately, I’ve been really getting into Tyrone Power movies, so I’m glad to see he got a day this year.  And since I’ve always wanted to see more Jeanette MacDonald movies, I’ll definitely be tuning in a lot for her day.

The complete Summer Under the Stars schedule is available to be download here.

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What’s on TCM: October 2011

This month’s schedule is one that I’m definitely a big fan of.  Being the big silent film fan that I am, obviously I am very excited for Buster Keaton being the star of the month!  Every Sunday night will be all Buster Keaton, all night long.  Not only that, since it’s October, it goes without saying that there will be plenty of classic horror movies to get you into the Halloween spirit. Monday nights are classic horror nights starting at 8:00 PM, with plenty more to come on October 29th , 30th, and 31st.  TCM will also be commemorating the 100th birthday of director Nicholas Ray by playing a night of his movies every Tuesday night this month.

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My Top 100, 10-1

We’ve made it to the final ten favorite movies!  I hope you enjoyed reading about my hundred favorite movies as much as I enjoyed writing about them.  I’m definitely thinking that I might have to do some more big lists like this in the future!  Thanks again to Colin from Pick ‘n’ Mix Flix Reviews for suggesting I do this list in the first place!  Now, with further ado, my final ten favorites…

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My Top 100, 30-21

Wow, I can’t believe we’re already up to number 30! This week is another week where if you don’t know anything at all about my style and only saw these ten movies, you’d get a pretty good idea of what my taste is.  So, let’s get on with the list!

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